Early signs you could be pregnant

Early signs you could be pregnant

Also in the very early weeks of a pregnancy, your baby isn’t the only one growing and changing – you are too. Every woman experiences unique symptoms, with some having very few and others the full house!

Once you have confirmed you are pregnant by taking a pregnancy test – the only way to be certain – then early symptoms may occur more quickly than you expect. There are several very common symptoms I see in pregnant woman in their early weeks of pregnancy:

1. Breast changes

Even during the first month of pregnancy, many women notice that their breasts start to grow, and feel tender, with the area around the nipples (the areolae) starting to darken. This is due to a woman’s hormone levels rapidly changing after conception, causing the glands inside the breast to grow and prepare for milk production and breastfeeding after baby is born.

It can take several weeks for your body to adapt to these new hormone levels but any breast discomfort should gradually settle as the pregnancy continues. Expect to go through several bra sizes when pregnant and don’t skimp on these as good support will help reduce stretching and sagging later on.

2. Fatigue

Feeling very tired is normal in pregnancy, starting as early as the first week of pregnancy, and this tiredness can feel overwhelming. It’s linked to hormonal changes, especially a rise in the hormone progesterone, although other factors such as low blood pressure and falling levels of sugar in the blood can also be a factor.

This exhaustion typically starts to ease away around the 12th to 14th week of pregnancy. Get plenty of rest – including catnaps in the day if you are able to – and eating foods that are rich in protein and iron.

3. Nausea

‘Morning sickness’ is perhaps the most famous symptom of pregnancy but not every pregnant woman gets it. Despite its name it can happen at any time of day or night, usually starting three to four weeks after you have missed your period. If you don’t develop morning sickness, don’t worry – you’re just lucky! The exact cause for it is still unclear but is likely to be linked to the very rapid rise in the hormone hCG.

You may also start to crave (or even go off) certain foods at this early stage. Fortunately, for most women the symptoms lessen at about the 13th or 14th week of their pregnancy. Aim to eat small meals often, avoid eating at bedtime, try eating ginger to reduce any nausea, wear clothes that don’t constrict your waist, and try to steer clear of strong smell.

Tips to slow down before giving birth

Tips to slow down before giving birth

Birth can be straightforward, can be exciting, intense, life changing, a really strong situation, probably not perfect…

As I explain in my antenatal courses in Barcelona or online, birth is physical but also a physiological and an emotional process.

Your birth will start when your oxytocin levels are high enough that your contractions can start… And basically oxytocin is the love and happiness hormone.

You need to feel relaxed, happy, stress free, let yourself slow down a little, a bit like the feelings you have when you’re on holiday, really.

I know, in our society, this is no easy task, we are so busy with our jobs, social life… How can you be relaxed before giving birth?

So how can you prepare for birth?

1. Take a longer break before baby, you’re never going to regret alone time pre kids, around in the 36 weeks if you can.

2. Go to a pregnancy yoga class, and not only for the body, for the mind. Learn to switch off that mind and relax. Show your body you love it, let it move slowly and gently and love yourself with some quiet time.

3. Have a relaxation ritual at home. Whether it’s yoga, meditation or just eating cake and a nice tea, take time for yourself doing nothing.

4. Deal with your fears. Whatever is in your head and swirling around in there, don’t sit with it. Talk to someone, write it down, clear those fears!

5. Do some research and write down a short birth preferences list. What’s important to you? Why is it important? How will this be achieved? Start the conversation with yourself and your partner.

6. You have to be able to say NO. You are your priority right now. You are growing your beautiful baby…that’s enough. Don’t run around doing a zillion things, now is not that time.

7. Sing to baby. Choose a lullaby now, when they’re in your arms they’ll be able to recognise it and be soothed by it

8. Prepare for after the birth. What will it be like? Talk to other mothers…what is essential? Food should be up there…an extra pair of hands, gather your tribe. And while you’re there ask them the same about their birth stories, get their tips!

9. Listen to yourself. Your body and your baby will send you signs…extra tired, achy back, feeling low…listen and look after yourself. This is a special time, don’t miss it being busy.

10. And above all, be open minded. We never know how your birth will be, often it may be something very different to what you expected. It is important to flow, to trust in the sanitary personnel you have chosen to be with you and to accept what comes…

Where to give birth in Barcelona

Vaginal Birth After C-Section

If you’ve delivered a baby by caesarean section, you may have a choice with your next pregnancy – a vaginal birth after caesarean, also known as a VBAC, or a planned (elective) caesarean. It depends on your medical circumstances, and it helps to know about the potential benefits and risks of VBAC. Vaginal Birth After C-Section

As long as you’re an appropriate candidate for a vaginal birth after a cesarean there’s a good chance you’ll succeed. Of course, your chances of success are higher if the reason for your previous c-section isn’t likely to be an issue this time around.

The chances of having a successful VBAC are higher if you and your baby are in good health and your pregnancy is progressing normally. In contrast, your doctor may recommend a planned caesarean if:

  • you have a pregnancy complication (for example, high blood pressure, your baby is in the breech position or there is concern about the size or health of your baby)
  • the reason you had your previous caesarean still exists
  • you’ve had two or more caesareans and no successful vaginal deliveries
  • your previous caesarean was performed using a vertical incision (cut) in your abdomen
  • you have a multiple pregnancy (for example, twins, triplets or more).

Why is a VBAC done?

Women consider VBAC for various reasons:

  • Shorter recovery time. You’ll have a shorter hospital stay after a VBAC than you would after a repeat C-section. Avoiding surgery will help you resume your normal activities sooner, as well as reduce the expense of childbirth.
  • Opportunity for an individualized birth plan. For some women, it’s important to experience a vaginal delivery.
  • Impact on future pregnancies. If you’re planning to have a larger family, VBAC might help you avoid the risks of multiple cesarean deliveries, such as scarring. Scarring might make additional surgery difficult and increase the risk of placental problems in pregnancies.
  • Lower risk of surgical complications. Vaginal deliveries have lower rates of bleeding, infection, blood clotting in one or more of the deep veins in the body (deep vein thrombosis), and injury to abdominal organs, such as the bladder or bowel.
when do i feed my baby

Ways to Establish a Positive Bond with Your Baby

Bonding is essential for a baby. Studies of newborn monkeys who were given mannequin mothers at birth showed that, even when the mannequins were made of soft material and provided formula to the baby monkeys, the babies were better socialized when they had live mothers to interact with. The baby monkeys with mannequin mothers also were more likely to suffer from despair. Scientists suspect that lack of bonding in human babies can cause similar problems. Ways to Establish a Positive Bond with Your Baby

Most infants are ready to bond immediately. Parents, on the other hand, may have a mixture of feelings about it. Some parents feel an intense attachment within the first minutes or days after their baby’s birth. For others, it may take a bit longer.

But bonding is a process, not something that takes place within minutes and not something that has to be limited to happening within a certain time period after birth. For many parents, bonding is a byproduct of everyday caregiving. You may not even know it’s happening until you observe your baby’s first smile and suddenly realize that you’re filled with love and joy.

The best way for a new mother to establish a positive bond with her newborn at home is breastfeeding so you have the physical connection. Besides the physical connection, the mother releases a lot of endorphins, happy hormones, during breastfeeding so moms are generally happier when they breastfeed. But if you have decided not to bresastfeed for any reason, you can look to your baby in the eyes having her really close meanwhile you feed her.

Making an Attachment

Bonding with your baby is probably one of the most pleasurable aspects of infant care. You can begin by cradling your baby and gently rocking or stroking him or her. If you and your partner both hold and touch your infant frequently, your little one will soon come to know the difference between your touches. Both of you can also take the opportunity to be “skin to skin” with your newborn by holding him or her against your own skin.

Babies may respond to infant massage, you’ll need to massage your baby very gently. Before trying out infant massage, be sure to educate yourself on proper techniques by checking out the many books, videos, and websites on the subject. You can also find out if there are classes in infant massage in your area.

Breastfeeding and bottle-feeding are both natural times for bonding. Infants respond to the smell and touch of their mothers, as well as the responsiveness of parents to their needs. In an uncomplicated birth, caregivers try to take advantage of the infant’s alert period immediately after birth and encourage feeding and holding of the baby. However, this isn’t always possible and, though ideal, immediate contact isn’t necessary for the future bonding of the child and parent.

¿Cuándo llevar a un bebé al médico?

¿Cuándo llevar a un bebé al médico?

Es común que los nuevos padres y madres se sientan como tú. Hasta hace poco, el bebé estaba sano y protegido dentro de ti. Aunque instintivamente sabes que es fuerte y resistente, a veces también recuerdas lo vulnerable que puede ser.

Si tu bebé tiene algún problema de salud o lo encuentras comportándose de forma extraña, confía en tu instinto.

Para protegerlo sigue algunas precauciones básicas: mantenlo alejado de personas enfermas y lávate las manos después de cada cambio de pañal. Si está amamantando, debes saber que ya lo está protegiendo.

Aquí una lista de síntomas que usted decidirá ir al médico.

Carácter. Si su bebé parece estar feliz y se alimenta bien, probablemente no esté gravemente enfermo. Esto no significa que no se deba pensar en agendar una cita para ver a su pediatra si tiene fiebre, moquitos o alguna otro síntoma. Pero es probable que un bebé que tenga tos y una gran sonrisa no esté tan enfermo como un bebé que tenga moquitos y esté muy letárgico.

Lloro inusual. Si su bebé comienza a llorar repentinamente más de lo normal y no puede consolarlo de la manera habitual, o si su llanto es débil o inusualmente agudo, es posible que esté enfermo.
Apetito. Si tu bebé cambia su apetito de un día para otro, si se cansa fácilmente de succionar o pierde interés en el pecho o en alimentarse probablemente esté enfermo. Además, si observa que su bebé regurgita su comida más de lo normal, con más esfuerzo.

Movimientos intestinales anormales. Los bebés pequeños, especialmente los bebés amamantados, suelen tener deposiciones suaves o líquidos. Sin embargo, si tu bebé tiene diarrea (deposiciones acuosas), su estómago puede tener algún problema. Controla la frecuencia y si la diarrea continúa asegúrate de hidratarlo con frecuencia. Es especialmente importante que controlemos las heces del bebé en ese caso para descartar que contienen sangre o moco.

Dificultad al respirar . Si observas que tu bebé tiene problemas para respirar, o que el bebé respira con dificultad, busca ayuda de inmediato.

Temperatura. Aunque la presencia de fiebres altas en un bebé es una señal de que está enfermo la fiebre sola no suele ser motivo de preocupación. Un bebé puede tener fiebre baja y estar gravemente enfermo, o fiebre alta y estar solo ligeramente enfermo. Pero si un bebé menor de tres meses tiene fiebre más alta que 38 grados C, debe ser examinado por un médico.

¿Cómo te ayuda una DOULA?

¿Cómo te ayuda una DOULA?

Cómo puede apoyarte una doula en el parto, el parto y el posparto

El embarazo puede ser un momento de gran alegría para muchas mujeres, pero a veces puede provocar preocupaciones o miedos.

Una doula puede ayudarte a aprovechar al máximo tu embarazo y tu parto, permitiéndote experimentar la alegría y la aventura de ser madre, por primera vez o en experiencias sucesivas… ¡Cada embarazo y parto son un mundo!.

Una doula también puede escucharte, ser una buena guía y ayudarte en momentos de estrés o cuando se deben tomar decisiones complejas: te dará la información adecuada y completa para que elijas de forma informada.

Pero una doula no solo está ahí solo para la futura mamá. ¡La doula también ayuda a la pareja y sobre todo cuida del bebé! La mayoría de las familias a las que yo acompaño comentan no solo el que la ayuda fue relevante para la madre, sino también a la pareja y la familia que se acaba de formar o que acaba decrecer.

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También puedo ofrecerte formación previa, a ti y a tu pareja, para que en caso de que deseéis estar solos en el paritorio, podáis tener la información necesaria.

Después del nacimiento, te puedo ofrecer apoyo a la lactancia materna. También estará disponible por teléfono y en visitas a tu casa para que aclares dudas o cuestiones, y esto suele ser un alivio para las mamás. También, como doula de post parto, puedo ayudarte quedándome contigo en algunos momentos.

Exercise During Pregnancy

Exercise During Pregnancy

In general, exercise during pregnancy does wonders. It boosts mood, improves sleep, and reduces aches and pains. It also prepares you for childbirth by strengthening muscles and building endurance, and makes it much easier to get back into shape after your baby is born.

Which exercises are best in pregnancy?

The ideal exercise in pregnancy will get your heart pumping and keep you supple, without causing physical stress. Many activities, such as running and weight training, are fine in the beginning, but you may need to modify your workout as you grow bigger. You’ll really feel the benefit if you do a combination of: aerobic exercise, which works your heart and lungs and muscle-strengthening exercise, which improves your strength, flexibility and posture.

To get the full benefits, you’ll need to exercise at least three times a week, ideally more. Try to find something that you enjoy, as you’ll be more likely to stick to it in the longer term. Build activity into your daily life, too. For example, taking the stairs instead of the lift, and doing housework or gardening, counts as exercise. Avoid doing sports where there’s a risk of hitting your bump, or of slipping and falling, such as squash, gymnastics, rollerblading, horse riding and skiing. The following types of exercise are safe in pregnancy, though some may not be suitable for the last few months, and you may need to lessen the activity as your pregnancy progresses. Talk to your doctor, midwife or a physiotherapist before starting any exercise that’s new to you.

You will probably want to avoid these types of exercises during pregnancy:

  • Activities where falling is more likely
  • Exercise that may cause any abdominal trauma, including activities with jarring motions, contact sports or rapid changes in direction
  • Activities that require extensive jumping, hopping, skipping, or bouncing
  • Bouncing while stretching
  • Waist twisting movements while standing
  • Intense bursts of exercise followed by long periods of no activity
  • Exercise in hot, humid weather
  • Do not hold your breath for an extended period of time
  • Do not exercise to the point of exhaustion
Birthing Pool Barcelona

Birthing Pool Barcelona

An increasing number of women are choosing to spend at least some of their labour immersed in water. Birthing pools are increasingly being more used in hospitals in Barcelona but just for dilation, and some women even choose to hire birthing pools for use at home, because is the only way you can give birth inside.

What different positions can I be in, in a birthing pool?

You could think about trying different positions before giving birth in water, such as:

  • Kneeling, leaning on the side of the pool.
  • Squatting, holding onto the sides of the pool.
  • Using floats under your arms for support.
  • Floating on your back with your hands holding the sides, while your head is supported on a waterproof pillow.
  • Floating on your tummy with your head turned sideways, resting on a pillow.

When might I need to get out of the pool?

Sometimes you may be asked to leave the pool during labour.

  • Changes in the baby’s heart rate
  • Meconium (baby’s poo) staining your waters;
  • Bleeding from your vagina during labour
  • If you develop a high temperature, pulse or blood pressure
  • You may also be asked to leave the pool for abdominal palpation and for vaginal examinations (to assess progress in labour).

If your labour slows down after about two hours, it may be wise to leave the pool – you can get in again later. You may choose to stay in to give birth, or find, as many women do, that dry land suits you better when the moment arrives. You will probably get out of the pool for the delivery of the placenta. When you get out, you need to be wrapped in a warm towel or a soft warm robe. If you are wearing a T-shirt in the water, it’s best to take it off while you are out so as not to cool down too much.

The advantages:

  • Warm water can provide relief from the discomfort of labour, and may even be used instead of medical pain relief.
  • It doesn’t prevent the use of other medicines, you would still be able to use certain forms of pain relief in the pool. Speak to your healthcare provider to find out more.
  • Water can have a calming effect, allowing you to relax during labour which can help labour to progress.
  • Water can support your weight, meaning that you may find yourself free from some aches and pains of late pregnancy.
  • Water can support your weight, leaving you better able to change position and stay upright.
  • The pool around you can help you to feel more private and protected.
  • Giving birth in water is thought to reduce the risk of vaginal tearing.

The disadvantages:

  • There are some forms of pain relief that are not compatible with the pool, so you may need to abandon the birthing pool if you want to use one of those pain relief options.
  • If you get into the pool before labour is underway, there are concerns that you could slow down the onset of labour.
  • Birthing pools are not available in all birthing units, you will need to check with your healthcare provider whether you will be able to have one on the day .
  • If you are planning a homebirth, you will need to hire a pool yourself which you will need to budget for.
  • Not all women experience the pain relieving benefits of water, some simply feel disappointed when they get into the pool.
¿Cuáles son los patrones de sueño de un recién nacido?

¿Cuáles son los patrones de sueño de un recién nacido?

El recién nacido promedio duerme gran parte del día y la noche, y se despierta solo para comer cada pocas horas. A menudo es difícil para una mamá y un papá primerizo saber cuánto tiempo y con qué frecuencia debe dormir un recién nacido.

Al inicio no hay un horario establecido y muchos recién nacidos no tienen establecidos los horarios de día y noche, y de hecho algunos pueden tener cambiado el horario de sueño de los adultos. En general, los recién nacidos duermen entre 8 y 9 horas durante el día y alrededor de 8 horas durante la noche.

Cabe recordar que los bebés, en general, no duermen la noche entera (de 6 a 8 horas sin despertarse) hasta pasados los 3 meses e incluso este proceso puede durar más de 1 año. Además los bebés recién nacidos tienen el estómago pequeño y deben despertarse cada pocas horas para comer. En la mayoría de los casos, tu bebé se despertará con hambre cada 3 horas. Pero esta es una cifra genérica: tu pediatra y tu sentido común te dirán si necesitas despertarlo o puedes dejarlo dormir.

Es interesante que estés atenta a los patrones de sueño del bebé: si tu bebé ha estado durmiendo bien y de seguido y de repente se está despertando con lloros de forma constante, puede haber un problema de salud como una infección de oído. Por lo general las alteraciones del sueño se deben simplemente a cambios en el desarrollo o debido a una sobreestimulación.

os bebés, como los adultos, tienen varias etapas y profundidades de sueño. Dependiendo de la etapa, el bebé puede moverse activamente o quedarse quieto. Los patrones de sueño infantil comienzan a formarse durante los últimos meses del embarazo: primero el sueño activo, luego el sueño tranquilo alrededor del octavo mes.

Para un bebé, igual que para un adulto, existen dos fases del sueño:

REM (sueño de movimientos oculares rápidos). Este es un sueño ligero cuando ocurren los sueños y los ojos se mueven rápidamente de un lado a otro. Aunque los bebés pasan aproximadamente 16 horas cada día durmiendo, aproximadamente la mitad de este tiempo está en sueño REM. Los niños mayores y los adultos duermen menos horas y pasan mucho menos tiempo en el sueño REM.

Sueño no REM. Es el profundo y se compone de 4 etapas

Etapa 1: somnolencia, ojos caídos, pueden abrirse y cerrarse, dormitar

Etapa 2: sueño ligero, el bebé se mueve y puede sobresaltarse o saltar con sonidos

Etapa 3: sueño profundo, el bebé está tranquilo y no se mueve.

Etapa 4: sueño muy profundo, el bebé está tranquilo y no se mueve.

Un bebé empieza su sueño en la etapa 1 del ciclo de sueño, luego pasa a la etapa 2, más tarde a la 3 para finalizar en la 4. Después recorre el proceso inverso: de la 3, a la 2 y luego a REM.

Además estos ciclos pueden ocurrir varias veces durante el sueño. Los bebés pueden despertarse cuando pasan de un sueño profundo a un sueño ligero y pueden tener dificultades para volver a dormir en los primeros meses.

Sobre todo es una cuestión de paciencia y de cariño hacia tu bebé: está aprendiendo a dormir. ¡Sé que al principio puede ser complejo pero… todos los bebés acaban durmiendo!

When to go to the doctor with a newborn?

When to go to the doctor with a newborn?

It’s common for new parents to feel the way you do. Until recently, you were able to keep your baby healthy by keeping her inside you. Even though you instinctively know she’s strong and sturdy, at times you also remember how vulnerable she can be.

First of all, give yourselves credit for being the caring, conscientious parents that you are. That said, you can take some precautions so that your baby will stay healthy. Keeping her away from sick people and washing your hands after each nappy change is a good start. If you’re breastfeeding, continue with it for as long as you can.

Here a list of syntomps that will you decide to go to the doctor

  • Temperament. If your baby seems like her usual happy self and is feeding well, she’s probably not seriously ill. This doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t consider an appointment to see your doctor if she has temperature or the sniffles. But a baby who has a runny nose and a big smile is probably not as sick as a baby who has a runny nose and is lethargic.
  • Unusual crying. If your baby suddenly starts crying more than usual and you can’t comfort her in the usual ways, or if her cry is weak or unusually high-pitched, she may be seriously ill. The opposite is also true — if your baby seems unhappy and doesn’t cry but is unusually inactive and difficult to wake from sleep, call your doctor.
  • Appetite. How hungry your baby is varies from day to day. But if she is hungry she should feed vigorously. A baby who tires easily from sucking or loses interest in nursing or feeding is probably sick. Also, if you notice your baby reguritating her food more than usual, with more effort, or if the possit is greenish in colour, she may be sick.
  • Abnormal bowel movements. Edit IN
  • Difficulty breathing. If your baby’s breathing is laboured or if she’s having trouble breathing at all, get help immediately.
  • Temperature. Although the presence of high temperature in a baby is a signal that she’s sick, the fever alone is usually not a reason to be worried. A baby can have a low-grade fever and be seriously ill, or a high fever and be only mildly ill. But if a baby under three months of age has a fever higher than 38 degrees C, she should be examined. If an older baby has a fever but appears completely well otherwise, observe her for a day to see whether she develops other symptoms.