pregnancy barcelona

Thoughts that you may have during your pregnancy

Ce’s not uncommon for women who are pregnant to worry about their unborn child, especially if it’s a first pregnancy. For example, there are common concerns like being worried about the baby getting proper nutrition, being afraid of going into premature labour, or even having a miscarriage. While having the odd episode of anxiety is considered a “normal” pregnancy reaction, there can be situations where a woman has irrational or crazy thoughts.

« Je’m Not Ready »

I don’t think I know a single parent who felt completely ready to have kids, especially once the pregnancy was under way. You always think you’re ready, until things get going and self-doubt shows up (uninvited, of course). Then you have these second thoughts, especially about being able to provide for your new child. Doubts are a healthy part of being a self-aware parent, in my opinion.

« What If Something Is Wrong With My Baby? »

No one asks for a baby with complications, but of the parents I know who had a child with unexpected medical problems (whether short term or long term), not a single one would trade their baby out for a « healthy » one. You will love your baby no matter what, and it’s normal to fear for their health and safety.

« Giving birth without my doctor is not possible »

Finding a good doctor to help you through a pregnancy and an obstetrician who you can trust to be there during labour is obviously important. Many women understandably get attached to their caregivers. It is not unusual though for a woman’s obstetrician to be unavailable when someone goes into labour, especially in the public health system in Spain. Some pregnant women worry throughout their entire pregnancy that they will give birth without their doctor present. They think they can’t possibly get through the process without him or her. Part of the problem is that they believe only their doctor knows their history and only their doctor will know how to handle all their needs during labour. One of the biggest fears of these women is, what if I get a doctor that isn’t good? There are even pregnant women that fear experiencing quick labour. You know, those situations you see in the movies where a woman can’t make it to the hospital and gives birth in a taxicab.

« Why Don’t I Love My Baby Yet? »

You haven’t met your baby yet. Right now, you are in that conceptual stage of parenthood, because while your body is taking care of your baby, you don’t have to actually do anything. Some women feel that magical connection before the baby is born, but if you’re not feeling it, it doesn’t mean you’re a bad mom, it just means you haven’t actually met your baby yet.

At the end all this fears are basically fear to the unknown. Fear of the unknown is best described as a phobia or irrational sensation of fear experienced about a person or situation that is foreign. We are all afraid of the unknown to a certain degree, but for some individuals such fear can be overwhelming to the point that one’s daily life and activities are hindered. There are many women who have admitted to avoiding pregnancy because they fear it; however, there are also those who become pregnant and then worry through the entire pregnancy about the unknown. Doing anything for the first time can be scary, but it can also be exciting. While this is certainly true with pregnancy, those who obsess over the unknown during this time of their lives are really missing out on a beautiful journey. When the fear overtakes them it is difficult for them to notice things like, the first time baby kicks or how their skin looks brighter. Women who fear the unknown during pregnancy often feel cheated after the baby is born because the last nine months were a blur due to their irrational thinking.

pregnant barcelona

5 Foods to Eat When You’re Pregnant

Maintaining a healthy diet during pregnancy is very important that’s why I want to explain you which5 foods to eat when you’re pregnant!

During this time, your body needs additional nutrients, vitamins and minerals
In fact, you may need 350–500 extra calories each day during the 2nd and 3rd trimesters
A diet that lacks key nutrients may negatively affect the baby’s development
Poor eating habits and excess weight gain may also increase the risk of gestational diabetes and pregnancy or birth complications
Put simply, choosing healthy, nutritious foods will help ensure the health of you and your baby.
It will also make it a lot easier to lose the pregnancy weight after you’ve given birth.
Here are 5 highly nutritious foods to eat when you’re pregnant.

1. Calcium products
During pregnancy, you need to consume extra protein and calcium to meet the needs of the growing fetus
Dairy products contain two types of high quality protein: casein and whey. Dairy but also some vegetables and fish are the best dietary source of calcium, and provides high amounts of phosphorus, various B-vitamins, magnesium and zinc.
Yogurt, especially Greek yogurt, is particularly beneficial for pregnant women .
It contains more calcium than any other dairy product. Some varieties also contain probiotic bacteria, which support digestive health .
People who are lactose intolerant may also be able to tolerate yogurt, especially probiotic yogurt .

2. Legumes

This group of food includes lentils, peas, beans, chickpeas, soybeans and peanuts.
Legumes are excellent plant-based sources of fiber, protein, iron, folate (B9) and calcium, all of which the body needs more of during pregnancy.
Folate is one of the B-vitamins (B9). It is very important for the health of the mother and fetus, especially during the first trimester.
However, most pregnant women are not consuming nearly enough folate .
This has been linked with an increased risk of neural tube defects and low birth weight. Insufficient folate intake may also cause the child to be more prone to infections and disease later in life .
Legumes contain high amounts of folate. One cup of lentils, chickpeas or black beans may provide from 65–90% of the RDA
Furthermore, legumes are generally very high in fiber. Some varieties are also high in iron, magnesium and potassium.

3. Broccoli and dark, leafy greens
Broccoli and dark, green vegetables, such as kale and spinach, contain many of the nutrients that pregnant women need.
These include fiber, vitamin C, vitamin K, vitamin A, calcium, iron, folate and potassium.
Furthermore, broccoli and leafy greens are rich in antioxidants. They also contain plant compounds that benefit the immune system and digestion .
Due to their high fiber content, these vegetables may also help prevent constipation. This is a very common problem among pregnant women .
Consuming green, leafy vegetables has also been linked with a reduced risk of low birth weight.

4. Lean meat
Beef, pork and chicken are excellent sources of high-quality protein.
Furthermore, beef and pork are also rich in iron, choline and other B-vitamins — all of which are needed in higher amounts during pregnancy.
Iron is an essential mineral that is used by red blood cells as a part of hemoglobin. It is important for delivering oxygen to all cells in the body.
Pregnant women need more iron, since their blood volume is increasing. This is particularly important during the third trimester.
Low levels of iron during early and mid-pregnancy may cause iron deficiency anemia, which doubles the risk of premature delivery and low birth weight .
It may be hard to cover iron needs with diet alone, especially since many pregnant women develop an aversion to meat .
However, for those who can, eating red meat regularly may help increase the amount of iron acquired from the diet.
Eating foods that are rich in vitamin C, such as oranges or bell peppers, may also help increase absorption of iron from meals.

5. Fish liver oil
Fish liver oil is made from the oily liver of fish, most often cod.
The oil is very rich in the omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA, which are essential for fetal brain and eye development .
Fish liver oil is also very high in vitamin D, which many people do not get enough of. It may be highly beneficial for those who don’t regularly eat seafood or supplement with omega-3 or vitamin D.
Low vitamin D intake has been linked with an increased risk of preeclampsia. This potentially dangerous complication is characterized by high blood pressure, swelling of the hands and feet, and protein in the urine .
Consuming cod liver oil during early pregnancy has been linked with higher birth weight and a lower risk of disease later in the baby’s life
A single serving (one tablespoon) of fish liver oil provides more than the recommended daily intake of omega-3, vitamin D and vitamin A.
However, it is not recommended to consume more than one serving (one tablespoon) per day, because too much preformed vitamin A can be dangerous for the fetus. High levels of omega-3 may also have blood-thinning effects

Overcome Your Fear of Childbirth Barcelona

Overcome Your Fear of Childbirth

Would you like to have a fearless birth? A birth you can look forward to?And would you like to know exactly how you can prepare for it?

Unfortunately a lot of women believe that giving birth is one of the worst experiences in a woman’s life and some women even choose not to have children because they are so scared of it. However, there are a lot of things we can do and here they are:

Number 1 – Trust Your Body: Women all over the world have given birth for thousands and thousands and thousands of years and in fact our amazing bodies are designed to give birth, right? Looking at it from an evolutionary standpoint, that’s really all we’re here for. Seeing other mammals give birth, they usually do this all by themselves and most of the time at night when it’s dark and quiet, shhhh and they are undisturbed. I do want you to take away from this is that your body knows what it’s doing. And even more so when you’re treating yourself well during your pregnancy! So trust your body!

Number 2 – Choose Your Birthing Team Wisely: Ideally you want to have a team including your birth partner, and that can be your intimate partner, your mum, a good friend, or your sister; a doula who will help both you and your partner with all sorts of things during labour and birth, a midwife and then depending on your personal preferences and financial situation, you might even consider hiring a photographer who can capture your memories. Of course you only want to work with people you trust.

Modifier ENake antenatal classes that will help you to understand the process and to be prepare for birth.

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Number 5 – Breathe: When you’re relaxed, you will naturally breathe deeper into your belly, which is so important for labour and birth.

Number 6 – Hum Your Baby Down: Breathe or hum your baby down and that’s something you want to be doing at the end instead of pushing. Most of us believe that we have to push the baby out and yes, most women actually feel the natural urge to push at the very end, and so did I. However, if you’re pushing too soon with too much force, you’re causing the sphincters of your vagina to close right in front of your baby’s head, which can slow down the process a lot. So hum your baby down.

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igns that will let you know that your baby is coming

6 signs that will let you know that your baby is coming

Every woman’s experience of labour is different. You may only be able to work out when labour truly started after you’ve been through it! However, changes that take place in pre-labour and early labour may cause tell-tale signs and symptoms that labour is imminent

1. Nesting: If so, labor is on the way. First, have you heard of « nesting? » Ce’s when you get this surge of energy that makes you want to cook, clean, and reorganize your home. For some women, it’s a clue that baby day could be coming up soon.

2. Lightening: « Lightening » is the feeling that your baby has dropped lower into your pelvis. It means labor isn’t far off!

3. Persistent lower back pain or abdominal pain, with a pre-menstrual feeling and cramps.

4. Bloody or transparent Discharge: If you notice brownish or red-colored mucus called discharge coming out of your vagina, it could mean your cervix is opening up.

5. Water Breaks: Your water could break before or during labor. It could feel like a big gush or a steady trickle. Sometimes it’s hard to tell whether it’s the real deal or just pee, so let your doctor know ASAP if you’re not sure. She may want to know what color the water was and what it smelled like.

6. Contractions: When you have contractions that gradually get stronger and closer together, that means the countdown to a baby is on! They’ll be so powerful that you won’t be able to walk or talk while you’re having them. And they won’t go away if you move around or change positions, either.

toxoplasmosis and pregnancy

Toxoplasmosis and pregnancy

What is toxoplasmosis?

Toxoplasmosis is an infection caused by a tiny parasite called Toxoplasma gondii. It’s usually a mild disease, which often has no symptoms at all, but if you catch it for the first time in early pregnancy it can cause serious health problems for your baby. You can be infected with toxoplasmosis from eating meat that is either raw, cured, or undercooked.

The toxoplasmosis parasite is also found in:

  • unpasteurised goat’s milk or cheese
  • unwashed fruit or vegetables
  • cat poo (most animals can be infected with toxoplasmosis but cats are the only ones to pass it on through their poo)

You can only catch toxoplasmosis once, after that you’re immune to it. So if you’ve had it in the past there’s no risk to your pregnancy. The problem is, the symptoms are so mild you probably won’t know if you’ve had it or not. So it’s wise for everyone to take steps to avoid being infected. Fortunately there’s lots you can do.

Will toxoplasmosis harm my unborn baby?

It can do. The toxoplasmosis parasite can infect your placenta and your baby and cause a condition called congenital toxoplasmosis, but it’s very rare for this to happen. Of all babies born, between one in 10,000 and one in 30,000 are born with congenital toxoplasmosis.

The risk to your baby depends on when you were infected with toxoplasmosis. It’s more likely to spread to your baby in later pregnancy, although if you catch it in early pregnancy the effects on your baby are likely to be more severe. Sadly, congenital toxoplasmosis in early pregnancy can lead to misscarriage.

Most babies with congenital toxoplasmosis have no obvious problems at birth. However these babies may develop symptoms during the next few months or years. These may include:

  • damage to the eyes
  • hearing problems
  • learning difficulties as a result of brain damage

About one in 10 babies with congenital toxoplasmosis will have a severe infection with problems that affect them as soon as they are born. Signs of a serious infection include:

  • an eye infection
  • an enlarged liver and spleen
  • jaundice (yellowing of the eyes and skin)
  • pneumonia

Sadly, congenital toxoplasmosis can also cause a baby to be stillborn.

How can I prevent toxoplasmosis?

There are simple steps you can take to protect yourself from catching toxoplasmosis.

When it comes to food:

  • Thoroughly cook all meat and chilled or frozen ready meals before you eat them.
  • Avoid eating cured meat, such as jamón, parma ham and salami.
  • Follow good hygiene when handling or preparing meat. Keep kitchen utensils that you’ve used on raw meat away from food that you’re going to eat without cooking and wash the utensils thoroughly before you use them again.
  • Wash your hands before touching your food. After you’ve finished cooking, wash your hands and all cooking utensils and surfaces thoroughly.
  • Wash fruit and vegetables, particularly if you are eating them raw.
  • Don’t drink unpasteurised milk, cheese, or cream made from unpasteurised goat’s milk.

When you’re gardening or handling soil or sand, wear gloves. Then wash your hands afterwards in case you have come into contact with cat poo in the soil. If your child has an outdoor sand box, cover it up to prevent cats using it as a litter tray.

Some farm animals can also carry toxoplasmosis. If you’ve been in contact with sheep at farmsor been visiting outdoor play centres where there are animals, wash your hands thoroughly afterwards.

If you have a cat, it’s best if someone else can deal with the litter tray while you’re pregnant. If you have to clear the litter tray yourself use gloves and wash your hands afterwards. Also, make sure the litter tray is emptied daily and cleaned with hot, soapy water, as the toxoplasmosis parasite in cat poo becomes infectious after 24 hours.

stage of labour barcelona

Giving Birth: Stages (Part 2)

What happens in the second stage of labour?

This is the stage when your baby is born. During the second stage of labour, your baby will descend into your vagina (the birth canal) and you’ll push your baby down and out to meet you for the first time.

You’ll feel the pressure of your baby’s head low down in your pelvis, and with each contraction, you may feel strong urges to bear down. Listen to your body, and push in response to the urges. Take a few breaths between pushes if that’s what feels right.
With every push, your baby will move further through your pelvis, but at the end of the contraction, he’ll probably slip back a little again. This is normal and gives the muscles of your pelvic floor time to stretch gradually. As long as your baby keeps gradually moving down, you’re doing fine.

When your baby’s head is visible at the entrance to your vagina and stays there when the contraction has ended, it’s called crowning.

Your midwife will tell you when she can see your baby’s head, and may ask you to stop pushing and blow or sigh out your breaths. This helps you to resist the urge to bear down for two contractions or three contractions, so that your baby is born gently and slowly.

Taking this approach may help to protect your perineum (the area between your vulva and your anus). You’ll probably feel a hot, stinging sensation, as the opening of your vagina starts to stretch around your baby’s head. Your midwife may use warm compresses to support your perineum as it stretches to help to prevent a tear.

Once your baby is born, he’ll be dried off with a clean towel and then placed onto your tummy or chest for skin to skin

What happens in the third stage of labour?

The third stage of labour begins once your baby is born, and ends when you deliver the placenta and the empty bag of waters that are attached to the placenta (membranes). These come away as your womb contracts down after the birth.

Your contractions will be noticeable but weaker when they begin again. The placenta will peel away from the wall of your womb and move down the birth canal into your vagina. You may get the urge to push as this happens.

Ce’s routine to be offered an injection for the third stage that helps your womb to contract down and the placenta to come away. This may cause side-effects such as nausea and vomiting, because of the drugs used. You won’t have to do any pushing, as once it’s detached, your midwife will gently pull out the placenta and membranes.

If all went well in your pregnancy and labour, you can choose to have a natural (physiological) third stage. This is when you deliver the placenta without an injection. Upright positions, skin to skin contact with your baby, and starting to breastfeed your baby may all help to stimulate contractions to help you deliver the placenta.

Whether you have a natural or a managed third stage, it’s recommended to wait at least a few minutes before clamping the cord, which will benefit your baby. While all this is going on, you’re likely to be cuddling and getting to know your newborn better.

 

 

giving birth barcelona

Giving Birth: Stages (Part I)

Every woman’s experience of labour is different. Nobody can predict what your labour will be like, or how long it will last. But there are plenty of things you can do to prepare yourself. What are the stages of labour?

Labour moves forward in three clear stages:

  • First stage: when contractions gradually open up the cervix, which is the neck of your womb (uterus).It consists of early labour, active labour, and the transitional phase.
  • Second stage: when you push your baby out into the world.
  • Third stage: when you deliver the placenta.

There is also a phase called pre-labour, which happens before the first stage of labour.

What happens in pre-labour?

During pregnancy, your cervix is closed and plugged with mucus, to keep out infection. Your cervix is long and firm, giving a strong base to your womb. It’s also in a position that points slightly towards your back (posterior position).

Before labour can start properly, your cervix has to go through some changes. It has to move forward (anterior position), soften and shorten. The softening of your cervix is often called ripening.

What happens in the first stage of labour?

In the first stage of labour, your cervix has to open (dilate), so your baby can be born. The muscles of your womb tighten with each contraction and then release, gradually drawing your cervix up into the lower section of your womb.

In the early phase of first stage labour, your cervix may open very gradually so that it may seem as if no changes are happening at all. Early labour can be slow and your contractions may not last for long and have lengthy gaps between them. They may even stop for a while before starting again.

As you enter the active phase of first stage labour, the contractions usually last longer, and become more frequent and powerful. Towards the end of the first stage, your labour may become much more intense. This phase of labour is called transition. By the end of the first stage your cervix will be fully dilated, and open to about 10cm (3.9in) in diameter.

If this is your first baby, your cervix will first soften and shorten, and then begin to dilate. If you’ve had a baby before, this tends to happen simultaneously, meaning your labour may be shorter.

Sleeping better during pregnancy

Sleeping better during pregnancy

Yes, sleeping and pregnancy can go together! It is true that during the lasts months of pregnancy going to sleep can be a hard because your body is changing rapidly, you have a lot of things on your mind, and it may get more difficult to find a comfortable sleep position. Sleeping better during pregnancy is possible if your know how!

 

Laugh!

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Move

A pregnancy aerobic workout, prenatal yoga, a walk, whatever it is you want to do — get up and move! Dance! Try to keep from exercising late in the day, because the increased adrenaline of an “exercise high” can linger and make it harder for you to fall asleep.

Careful with eating habits

Eat your meals, especially later ones, at a leisurely pace. Spend your dinnertime unwinding a bit. Avoid caffeine and alcohol — both are detrimental to the sleep cycle. If frequent trips to the bathroom keep you up at night, limit your fluid intake late in the day. Try hot milk and honey, or hot almond milk and honey, the combination is known to promote sleeping.

Make your bedroom a sleep sanctuary.

If you’re having bouts of insomnia, this may not be the best time to set up the home office in the bedroom. Surround yourself with pictures of happy babies, mothers breastfeeding their babies and any picture that will put a smile on your face. Be gentle with yourself, you have all the knowledge you need to bring this child into the world, it is written in your DNA. Let go, and let the Mother cuddle you in her arms for a full night of sleep.

pregnant barcelona

First trimester: What to do if you are pregnant in Barcelona

Having a baby is one of the most joyous times in many women’s lives. From anticipating the day you’ll bring your little one home, to picking a name and nursery colors, the excitement is palpable.

The first trimester begins on the first day of your last period and lasts until the end of week 12. This means that by the time you know for sure you’re pregnant, you might already be five or six weeks pregnant!

A lot happens during these first three months. The fertilised egg rapidly divides into layers of cells and implants in the wall of your womb where it carries on growing. These layers of cells become an embryo, which is what the baby is called at this stage.During this trimester, your baby grows faster than at any other time.

What you need to do if you are pregnant in Barcelona

  • Arrange your first appointment with your midwife: you can go for public health system, so first you will need to go to your CAP or for private clinics.
  • Take a daily folic acid supplement
  • Check before taking medicines
  • If you smoke, it’s time to quit
  • Cut out alcohol and cut down caffeine

 

By six weeks, a heartbeat can usually be heard and by the end of week 12, your baby’s bones, muscles and all the organs of the body have formed. At this point, your baby looks like a tiny human being and is now called a fetus. He or she will even be practising swallowing!

Pregnancy is different for every woman. Some women glow with good health and vitality during those first three months; others feel absolutely miserable. Here are some of the changes you might experience, what they mean, and which signs warrant a call to your doctor.

Bleeding. About 25% of pregnant women experience slight bleeding during their first trimester. Early in the pregnancy, light spotting may be a sign that the fertilized embryo has implanted in the uterus. However, if you have significant bleeding, cramping, or sharp pain in your abdomen, call your doctor. These could be signs of a miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy (a pregnancy in which the embryo implants outside of the uterus).

Breast tenderness. Sore breasts are one of the earliest signs of pregnancy. They’re triggered by hormonal changes, which are preparing your milk ducts to feed your baby, and will probably last through the first trimester. Going up a bra size (or more) and wearing a support bra can make you feel more comfortable; you can go back to the lacy bras after your baby is finished nursing.

pregnant barcelona

Pregnant in Barcelona: a shopping list

Congrats!

You are pregnant! Do you know everything you are going to need meanwhile you are expecting your baby?

 

New pants or a waistband extender

Your belly may not be visibly rounder yet, but your pants may not be fitting as well, even just a few weeks in. A new pair of pants with a bit of Lycra stretch might round out your wardrobe perfectly.

If you don’t want to start buying new clothes just yet, try a waistband extender such as the Belly Belt or Bella Band. Keeping comfy is your new mission, and it’s more important than you may think: Some women report that a looser waistband helps with morning sickness.

 

Body pillow

Some pregnant women say their number one favorite purchase is their body pillow. Even this early, you may get uncomfortable easily, and a body pillow may help you get a better night’s sleep.

 

Tooth care

Your mouth may be drier, your gums more sensitive – and you’re more susceptible to gingivitis now. Preventing periodontal disease is vital for pregnant women, so buy yourself a nice new, soft-bristled toothbrush and some dental floss and use them every day to keep your mouth fresh and healthy.

 

A comfy cotton bra

Your breasts are probably feeling more tender now. And while you may not be ready for a maternity bra, a sports bra or comfortable cotton bra without underwire will give you gentle support and ease discomfort.

 

A good body lotion

Your skin may start feeling drier, especially on your belly as it grows and your skin stretches. Find a good all-over moisturizer that you can slather on now and throughout your pregnancy.
Pregnancy journal
You’ve just begun an incredible journey. How are you feeling? What are you thinking? Jot down your emotions, thoughts, or questions in a pregnancy journal. It can help you feel connected to the little person growing inside you and will be a one-of-a-kind keepsake after your baby is born.